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Zeiss Distagon C 40mm f4

Just bought on ebay a Zeiss Distagon C 40mm f4. It was advertised originally with T* coating; unofortunately I only noticed after purchasing that the seller had revised his description that the lense was uncoated.

I understand from Norton (Hasselbald System Compedium) that the T* coating made a significant improvement. I am not sure whether Norton based this on sales or technical data from Zeiss/Hasselblad. What are the thoughts of those who have used both. I guess the coating will have some improvement in reducing flare, but does this improvement discount the earlier version without the coating.

Put it another way. Do I keep the lense or re-sell it for a T*coated version?

I am beggining photography again after a 25 yr absence as a beginner starting to shoot 35mm with Olympus OM1 and OM2 (which I still have). Though this is my first attempt at MF and I am just getting together ny kit slowly.

I want to do mainly landscape and also some architecture in monochrome and so far I have a 205FCC, with 2 E12 backs, 110mm f2 planar (FE version); Polaplus polaroid back. In addition, I also aquired an XPAN 11 with 45mm lense - while waiting for a 205FCC to appear on the market for sale. I have just bought a Gitzo tripod and a LowPro NatureTrekker to carry it all in. I hope soon to add soon a 50mm f2.8 Distagon (FE) version which is advertised by a dealer at a reasonable price.

Your collective espertise and thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

Paul
 
Just bought on ebay a Zeiss Distagon C 40mm f4. It was advertised originally with T* coating; unofortunately I only noticed after purchasing that the seller had revised his description that the lense was uncoated.

It is not uncoated, it is just not multicoated with the T* process. Polypal used to have a non-T* C40, I got the opportunity to have a close look at that one.

See it this way: wide angle lenses benefit most from improved reflection reduction as offered by better coating. It does not mean a non-T* lens is inferior, it just means you have to be more careful with highlights and stray sunrays etc.

Do you have a shade with the C40? If so, use it! I would first do some serious tryout shooting before selling it, it might be a correct fit for the shooting you do.

Wilko
 
I still have the C 40 without T*, nothing wrong with that lens.
The only thing is you need a Buick tyre, words from Marc Williams, as a shade.
Talking about shades I do hope Paul has one.
The shade does more against flair than T*.

T* is an improvement in the battle against flair.
Wide angles benefit more than longer lenses from this treatment.
Large front elements, the C 40 is an excellent example of that, are more prone to flair than lenses with smaller front glass.
T* is also improves colour.

How are these improvements in absolute terms?
Think of them as 1-3 % of an already very good design.


40 mm C lens.jpg

40mm C lens front element.


Do not say Marc and I did not warn you:

40 mm C with shade.jpg

40 mm C with shade.
 

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With the exception of the 202FA camera all C lenses can be used with F cameras from the 2000 and the 200 series.
To use the focal plane shutter the lens has to be set to "B".

If the leaf shutter is prefered the camera body needs to be set to C mode.
The focal plane shutter functions as an auxilary shutter in C mode.
This goes both for C and CF lenses.
 
Thank you to everyone for your input on the Zeiss Distagon C 40mm f4.

As advised, I will keep it and try it out, but will have to find a lens hood (anybody have a spare one they can sell to me?). Or alternativley, I may be able to use a Lee Filter Hood which I intend to buy, if there is sufficient coverage?

Just to let you know that I find the forum very interesting and informative, so a big thanks to all of you who spend the time and energy to guide the less informed of us.

Best wishes, Paul
 
Thank you to everyone for your input on the Zeiss Distagon C 40mm f4.

As advised, I will keep it and try it out, but will have to find a lens hood (anybody have a spare one they can sell to me?). Or alternativley, I may be able to use a Lee Filter Hood which I intend to buy, if there is sufficient coverage?

Note that these hoods are not that common, and do not come cheap (although you might get lucky of course).

Wilko
 
I have such a hood as spare. Location is Germany. Send me a PN if interested. It will cost as much as a Buick tyre though...

Ulrik
 
It has arrived... C40 f4

Just arrived in the post my Zeiss Distagon C40mm f4 which I bought through ebay... but on seeing the flimsy box it came in I was deeply concerned as to its condition as the box was badly crushed on one side. On opening the box, the lense had what can only be describes as basic protection. I can't believe it has not been damaged! What are some people thinking of when they send such a large and heavy object, and with glass components that are very susceptible to damage.

Any recommendations as to test the function(s) of the lense, following its difficult passsage to me in the UK from Portugal. Any help in advising this newbie would be appreciated.

Just have to add though... what a beauty... I think I will name this lense the "big boy"... this is some piece of glass! I thought the 110mm was big, until the C40mm arrived.

Paul
 
Any recommendations as to test the function(s) of the lense, following its difficult passsage to me in the UK from Portugal. Any help in advising this newbie would be appreciated.

The first thing I would try is the smoothness of the focusing. The helicoid ("Schnecke" in German) needs to move smoothly, no 'sticky' points etc. Try all diafragm settings, see if diafragm ring moves smoothly. The the shutter, all speeds should move nicely. The slow speeds tend to be too slow on older lenses that have not seen a CLA in a long time.

This packaging thing s*cks of course. No idea why people are so stupid. I plead guilty to over-engineering my packaging, but I have received enough 'scrap' in my job (computers) to be a bit paranoid. Has served me well, no complaints about wrecked shipments I sent..

Wilko
 
Two users here deserve special recommendation for the quality of their packing.
Funny thing is they both are and were into IT business.
Wilko and Jürgen will beat the highest grade mil. spec. in packing.

Imagine what it means to one of those guys to receive this:


Shoebox SWA 2.jpg

Shoebox SWA camera

Quite a disappointment when it took more than a year to find that camera.
 

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Now you have the lens in your hands you may wonder why it does not focus shorter than 0,95 m.
It does but close range is blocked to remind you that you are entering the range where the image quality of the lens is less good.
The ring that you grip to focus has a little control in it.
Push that control and the range from 0.95 m till 0.5 m is available.



40 mm c lens.jpg

40 mm C lens construction


interior with 40 mm c lens001-2.jpg

Interior shot with 40 mm C


Both images scanned from Hasselblad sales brochure 1975.
 

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Thanks Wilko and Paul. I have tested the focusing ring and it operates smoothly; the diaphragm ring appears to work well and "clicks" into place at all f stops, except f4 where there is a very slight low sounding "shudder" (perhaps that is too strong a word to describe it) as if something mechanical has fallen back into into it's resting position... if that makes any sense.

I found the close focusing lever which allows you to focus down from 19" - 3ft (I guess in continental Europe this is in metric). But I have yet to properly test at different speeds.

What do the "V", "X" and "M" denote, I guess the "X is for flash sync and the "M" is for manual. But what is the "V". How does the lens work with the 205FCC?

Paul
 
Please note the slow shutter speeds should go smooth with an even whir especially the 1 second.
If this is not the case the higher speeds will still function correctly.
Nevertheless the shutter needs to be serviced because the lubricant has dried and lost its function.

As for how to operate the lens with your 205 camera see post 5 in this thread.

The three position switch has the following functions:

M: For use with flashbulbs the shutter action is delayed because it takes a while for those bulbs to ignite and offer their full lighting power

X: Is for electronic flash synchronisation.

V: Is the selftimer setting it delays shutter operation by about 10 seconds. Usefull if you forgot the cable release and do not want to touch the camera at long exposures on a tripod.
Also useful if you want to be in the picture yourself of course.
 
Another question about 40mm C-lens

I just bought a Hasselblad 40mm C-lens.
I like to use a yellow or red filter, can anyone inform me what size is being used for this lens?
And where they are sold.
 
C 40 filter size

Welcome at Hasselbladinfo forum.

Congratulations on the purchase of the C 40 lens.

Bad news is the filter size is an indecent B104 only used for this lens that was supplied by Carl Zeiss to Hasselblad and Rollei.

Good news is I have both filters, red and yellow.
There is even a brandnew sealed yellow filter available.

Contact me by pm if you want to know more.


Paul


8 MTG
 
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